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The Misdiagnosis of Osteoporosis

Posted on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 by Machi Mannu Thumbnail

Osteoporosis is a commonly diagnosed medical problem. However, an increasing number of healthcare professionals are now asking questions regarding the validity of the diagnosis and the recommended treatment.

Osteoporosis refers to the loss of bone density and nearly always diagnosed in women. The diagnosis is usually made after a bone density scan or DEXA scan. However, many healthcare professionals question the reliability and safety of the bone density scan. For a start, the scan utilises X-rays which have been confirmed to cause severe damage to cells as well as cancer. 

The DEXA scan is also an antiquated diagnostic technology and has remained unchanged since the 1980s when it was first produced. 

But the worst flaw of DEXA scans is that they produce very inconsistent results. A study by Dr Susan Ott of The Washington State University had about 300 women take 2 DEXA scans, one taken soon after they came into a room, and the second after walking around the room for a few minutes. She found that the repeat experiments done on the same day revealed as much as 7% difference in scan results.

Other studies show that DEXA scan reports are favourable towards women with larger bones. DEXA scan results will also vary depending on the type of equipment used, the location of the equipment, as well as the operator and the reader of the scan. Several healthcare groups are of the opinion that the DEXA scan should no longer be in use.

Another concern surrounding osteoporosis is the drugs used for treatment which shockingly cause serious damage to bones. Understanding how such drugs damage our bones requires a brief understanding of how bones stay healthy. Our bones undergo a continual cycle of renewal, with old tissue removed, and new tissue produced to take the place of the old. And through this process, the bones stay healthy and strong.

Prescription drugs used for treating osteoporosis halts the removal of old bone tissue, leaving new bone tissue to pile on top of the old. The bones appear thicker on a DEXA scan, but in reality, they are weak and brittle and easily prone to fractures.  The commonest of such harmful drugs prescribed for osteoporosis are a class of drugs known as bisphosphonates, which includes alendronic acid and zoledronic acid.

The commonest side effects of such medications include bone fractures, jaw necrosis, irregular heart beat and oesophageal cancer.

The best way to strengthen bones and joints is by taking a natural mineral called MSM (Methyl Sulphonyl Methane) also known as fundamental sulphur. The body uses MSM to produce collagen, and collagen is vital for maintaining the structure and strength of the bones, joints, skin, hair, nails and the supporting fibres of the internal organs.



The Misdiagnosis of Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a commonly diagnosed medical problem. However, an increasing number of healthcare professionals are now asking questions regarding the validity of the diagnosis and the recommended treatment.

Osteoporosis refers to the loss of bone density and nearly always diagnosed in women. The diagnosis is usually made after a bone density scan or DEXA scan. However, many healthcare professionals question the reliability and safety of the bone density scan. For a start, the scan utilises X-rays which have been confirmed to cause severe damage to cells as well as cancer. 

The DEXA scan is also an antiquated diagnostic technology and has remained unchanged since the 1980s when it was first produced. 

But the worst flaw of DEXA scans is that they produce very inconsistent results. A study by Dr Susan Ott of The Washington State University had about 300 women take 2 DEXA scans, one taken soon after they came into a room, and the second after walking around the room for a few minutes. She found that the repeat experiments done on the same day revealed as much as 7% difference in scan results.

Other studies show that DEXA scan reports are favourable towards women with larger bones. DEXA scan results will also vary depending on the type of equipment used, the location of the equipment, as well as the operator and the reader of the scan. Several healthcare groups are of the opinion that the DEXA scan should no longer be in use.

Another concern surrounding osteoporosis is the drugs used for treatment which shockingly cause serious damage to bones. Understanding how such drugs damage our bones requires a brief understanding of how bones stay healthy. Our bones undergo a continual cycle of renewal, with old tissue removed, and new tissue produced to take the place of the old. And through this process, the bones stay healthy and strong.

Prescription drugs used for treating osteoporosis halts the removal of old bone tissue, leaving new bone tissue to pile on top of the old. The bones appear thicker on a DEXA scan, but in reality, they are weak and brittle and easily prone to fractures.  The commonest of such harmful drugs prescribed for osteoporosis are a class of drugs known as bisphosphonates, which includes alendronic acid and zoledronic acid.

The commonest side effects of such medications include bone fractures, jaw necrosis, irregular heart beat and oesophageal cancer.

The best way to strengthen bones and joints is by taking a natural mineral called MSM (Methyl Sulphonyl Methane) also known as fundamental sulphur. The body uses MSM to produce collagen, and collagen is vital for maintaining the structure and strength of the bones, joints, skin, hair, nails and the supporting fibres of the internal organs.


user

The Misdiagnosis of Osteoporosis

Posted on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 by Machi Mannu Thumbnail

Osteoporosis is a commonly diagnosed medical problem. However, an increasing number of healthcare professionals are now asking questions regarding the validity of the diagnosis and the recommended treatment.

Osteoporosis refers to the loss of bone density and nearly always diagnosed in women. The diagnosis is usually made after a bone density scan or DEXA scan. However, many healthcare professionals question the reliability and safety of the bone density scan. For a start, the scan utilises X-rays which have been confirmed to cause severe damage to cells as well as cancer. 

The DEXA scan is also an antiquated diagnostic technology and has remained unchanged since the 1980s when it was first produced. 

But the worst flaw of DEXA scans is that they produce very inconsistent results. A study by Dr Susan Ott of The Washington State University had about 300 women take 2 DEXA scans, one taken soon after they came into a room, and the second after walking around the room for a few minutes. She found that the repeat experiments done on the same day revealed as much as 7% difference in scan results.

Other studies show that DEXA scan reports are favourable towards women with larger bones. DEXA scan results will also vary depending on the type of equipment used, the location of the equipment, as well as the operator and the reader of the scan. Several healthcare groups are of the opinion that the DEXA scan should no longer be in use.

Another concern surrounding osteoporosis is the drugs used for treatment which shockingly cause serious damage to bones. Understanding how such drugs damage our bones requires a brief understanding of how bones stay healthy. Our bones undergo a continual cycle of renewal, with old tissue removed, and new tissue produced to take the place of the old. And through this process, the bones stay healthy and strong.

Prescription drugs used for treating osteoporosis halts the removal of old bone tissue, leaving new bone tissue to pile on top of the old. The bones appear thicker on a DEXA scan, but in reality, they are weak and brittle and easily prone to fractures.  The commonest of such harmful drugs prescribed for osteoporosis are a class of drugs known as bisphosphonates, which includes alendronic acid and zoledronic acid.

The commonest side effects of such medications include bone fractures, jaw necrosis, irregular heart beat and oesophageal cancer.

The best way to strengthen bones and joints is by taking a natural mineral called MSM (Methyl Sulphonyl Methane) also known as fundamental sulphur. The body uses MSM to produce collagen, and collagen is vital for maintaining the structure and strength of the bones, joints, skin, hair, nails and the supporting fibres of the internal organs.



The Misdiagnosis of Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a commonly diagnosed medical problem. However, an increasing number of healthcare professionals are now asking questions regarding the validity of the diagnosis and the recommended treatment.

Osteoporosis refers to the loss of bone density and nearly always diagnosed in women. The diagnosis is usually made after a bone density scan or DEXA scan. However, many healthcare professionals question the reliability and safety of the bone density scan. For a start, the scan utilises X-rays which have been confirmed to cause severe damage to cells as well as cancer. 

The DEXA scan is also an antiquated diagnostic technology and has remained unchanged since the 1980s when it was first produced. 

But the worst flaw of DEXA scans is that they produce very inconsistent results. A study by Dr Susan Ott of The Washington State University had about 300 women take 2 DEXA scans, one taken soon after they came into a room, and the second after walking around the room for a few minutes. She found that the repeat experiments done on the same day revealed as much as 7% difference in scan results.

Other studies show that DEXA scan reports are favourable towards women with larger bones. DEXA scan results will also vary depending on the type of equipment used, the location of the equipment, as well as the operator and the reader of the scan. Several healthcare groups are of the opinion that the DEXA scan should no longer be in use.

Another concern surrounding osteoporosis is the drugs used for treatment which shockingly cause serious damage to bones. Understanding how such drugs damage our bones requires a brief understanding of how bones stay healthy. Our bones undergo a continual cycle of renewal, with old tissue removed, and new tissue produced to take the place of the old. And through this process, the bones stay healthy and strong.

Prescription drugs used for treating osteoporosis halts the removal of old bone tissue, leaving new bone tissue to pile on top of the old. The bones appear thicker on a DEXA scan, but in reality, they are weak and brittle and easily prone to fractures.  The commonest of such harmful drugs prescribed for osteoporosis are a class of drugs known as bisphosphonates, which includes alendronic acid and zoledronic acid.

The commonest side effects of such medications include bone fractures, jaw necrosis, irregular heart beat and oesophageal cancer.

The best way to strengthen bones and joints is by taking a natural mineral called MSM (Methyl Sulphonyl Methane) also known as fundamental sulphur. The body uses MSM to produce collagen, and collagen is vital for maintaining the structure and strength of the bones, joints, skin, hair, nails and the supporting fibres of the internal organs.